Post Date: January 23rd, 2019

How to sell your top skills at any age

Older clients tell me their age is getting in the way of career success. Interestingly, younger clients tell me the same thing.

When you’re not getting callbacks you have to consider whether age is a factor. Before you do, consider that there may be other factors at play that are reducing your job prospects. There are better ways for older and younger workers to sell their value to employers. Challenge your thinking about how you sell your top talents to employers.

(Younger readers, please scroll down)

Older workers: if you worry age is playing a factor in your job search consider these strategies.

First, alleviate any/all employer’s concern with hiring you.

  • Address the issue of age and sell it as a feature.
  • With age comes wisdom. Use this to your advantage.
  • Demonstrate how your experience will add value to the organization.

For example:

* You’ve been in the industry for years = experience

* You know what works, what doesn’t work = you mitigate risk

* You know the key players in the industry = you are well-connected (network)

* You know the inner workings of most organizations = you know and influence key players

* You know the interplay between personalities = you know how to motivate individuals

In a job search you must focus on your strengths. Identify all the ways you bring value to an organization.

You cannot prevent age discrimination. If an employer is discriminatory towards you, it is important to know your rights. There are links below with the US and Canadian age discrimination laws for your reference.

After writing this post about older workers, a reader commented:

“Can we have another post for younger workers who don’t have many years of experience?”

Of course, the same applies to younger workers, but the abilities you sell are different.

Young workers: If you worry your lack of experience is playing a factor in your job search consider these strategies:

First, alleviate any/all employer’s concern with hiring you.

Address your lack of experience and sell it as a feature.

  • You bring with you no bad habits; are teachable and eager to make a contribution.
  • You’re good for the bottom-line. You cost less to hire than a more experienced professional.
  • Your education is the latest and greatest and will add tremendous value to an organization.
  • You’ve studied trends in your field and can share your ideas about future trends.
  • You have a network of classmates working in the industry and access to your professors.
  • You are unafraid of technology and can use it to make things easier.

According to YouthJobsCanada “Hiring youth makes good business sense! Younger workers are often energetic, skilled with technology, accustomed to multi-tasking, innovative and bright thinkers.”

Conclusion:

There are times when it pays to hire experience and there are times when the enthusiasm of youth is what is required. Everybody has something unique to offer. Whether you’re an older worker or younger worker – address any employer concerns and show them why you’re the best fit for the job!

Note: Age discrimination is a serious offence. If you or someone you know has experienced age discrimination, know your rights.

Age Discrimination (US) https://www1.eeoc.gov/laws/types/age.cfm

Age Discrimination (CAN) http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/eng/content/provincial-territorial-human-rights-agencies

Related Categories: Client questions, Uncategorized, Value Proposition